About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 32
MSNBCW 21
CNN 10
KGO (ABC) 5
KPIX (CBS) 5
MSNBC 3
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 83
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)
. at least 11 more palestinians killed today across gaza. that is according to the official hamas tv channel. it's unclear if anyone died in the apparent israeli air strike that you see in gaza city, but the casualty count now stands at 142 palestinians dead, 1,180 wounded. >> the number of dead and wounded also rising in israel. hospital officials now say 24 people were wounded in this morning's bus bombing in tel aviv. no one was killed, though, but since the conflict with hamas began, five israelis have been killed. more than 70 wounded. witnesses say they saw a man throw the bag into the bus, and run away, and it blew up. official from both sides at this time yesterday, they actually believe that a cease-fire between israel and hamas was close, but diplomats today, they are furiously trying to get peace talks back on track, but there is still a lot of shock. there's action newsing other the streets of tel aviv. want to go there live to talk to sarah seidner. give us the latest of this bus bomb that went off, and what is the reaction, the response to people there about the possibility of
they say not yet a done deal. hamas is trying to push this forward. what do we know? >> well i think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal
>>> that does >>> tonight, cease-fire, israel and hamas lay down their arms, for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. the right thing for the state of israel is to exhaust this opportunity to obtain a long-term cease-fire. >> our brothers will guarantee the implementation of all of these understandings in this agreement. >> will the fragile peace hold? both sides tell me what it will take. >>> also, rudy giuliani on what it all means for america. >>> plus, is it all too soon to talk 2016, and should we be talking about hillary clinton? my political all-stars battle it out. this is "piers morgan tonight." good evening, big story tonight, celebrations in the middle east over the fragile peace, a cease-fire, the israeli president, netanyahu. >> we want the entire world to understand our people and our cause. through you, we can explain the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy because they have failed in their attempt. >> i have to say that all of this was done with the firm support on the part of the leaders of the international community, and i would like
hamas truce has changed the region. and wolf's interview with perez on president obama's role in the negotiations and whether he ever threw israeli under the bus. >>> and during this busy holiday travel season, we go behind the scenes with airport pit crews. you'll see what it takes to gets flights turned around safely and on time. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." ♪ >>> it's been a historic week in the middle east, but the cease-fire between israel and hamas was only a first step toward seeking a broader piece in a very volatile region. and now one of the crucial players in securing the truce is under fire in his own country. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> repo
-- the sources are saying that the lull in fighting simply allows, would allow hamas which has suffered tremendous damage from israel's more than 1,100, 1,200 air raids it would allow them to collect themselves again. if the fighting continues, hamas would be in a stronger position. israel wants to deal. if there's no deal, then as they keep saying, all options are still open. >> martin fletcher reporting from tel aviv, thanks so much. >>> we want to bring in our political panel. we have nationally syndicated radio talk show host and msnbc contributor michael and perry bacon, political editor. yes men, great to have you here. it seems that every president in modern times has had to deal with the tensions that flair up within the middle east. they always try to talk about overseeing a long-term cease-fire. as we should on the brink of those discussions right now, between gaza and israel, what is the broader impact of the idea that not only will there be a cease-fire, but the fact that israel's neighbors will verify their right to exist, which is the longer formatted problem? >> well, yea
of fighting. the truce is now nearly 24 hours old and appears to be holding. hamas has declared a public holiday to mark what its leeades are calling a victory. the man being parade r for making it happen is morsi. let's begin with you. what is happening or not happening now? >> reporter: it's such a difference to what we were going through just 24 hours ago when the streets were completely deserted. we were seeing out going rockets and feeling many more incoming rounds. right now the streets are bustling with activity. people out and about. we did see those celebrations beginning very shortly after the cease-fire was announced. there was another gathering at midday today. people calling this a victory on the one hand for hamas. others really out just for the pure simple fact that now they can go out without fear of being caught up in the violence. many are under no illusion this is a long lasting solution. >> do people in gau sau feel like israel will honor the agreement and that this truce will hold. >> reporter: there's no trust between their history. something of a test period to s s
between israel and hamas, experts say there will likely be a lot more bloodshed before the violence stops. and it's the gaffe that has some republicans shaking their heads. why mitt romney says obama won because of the gifts he gave. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west. we start in gaza this hour, as people there have to fear death from above. israeli war planes have been relentless in their attacks on targets in gaza. they are hunting rocket launchers, but dozens of civilians have been killed as a result. the latest round of this conflict started wednesday, and there is no end in sight. sarah sidener is in gaza city for us. what are you seeing at this hour? are you hearing or seeing any air strikes? >> reporter: we're hearing drones above, but just five minutes before we started this show, we saw rockets coming out of central gaza, literally a few hundred yards away from us. we could see the rockets going up into the air, and they were sort of white, and then they would disappear and they were pointed, of course, towards israel
. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was leaning towards accepting this draft proposal sent by hamas via the egyptian government. so once it was clear that those efforts had sort of run into a brick wall, we saw an intensification of israeli air strikes and of course rocket fire out of gaza as well. one of the rockets, rather, one of the air strikes hit
may be critical in determining which direction israel's going to take in its conflict with hamas militants. despite 30,000 israeli troops massed at the gaza border and tough talk from both sides, there's still a chance for diplomacy. but time is running out. today was the deadliest day yet. israel says it lobbed 130 rockets into gaza, and some reports say up to 29 palestinians were killed today alone, including ten members of the same family. on the other side of the border, air sirens screamed out in several cities. israel says it intercepted dozens of the nearly 150 rockets hamas fired, including two targeted at tel aviv. their shelling is intense on both sides. cnn's anderson cooper witnessed it firsthand. he's been reporting live from gaza city and earlier i was on the air with anderson when a massive explosion took place nearby. watch what happened. >> in that blast we know ten members of one family, also two media centers -- whoa. that was a rather large explosion. that occurred, look out here, i can't actually see where the impact of that was. it's actually set off a numbe
hamas in the gaza strip and the form of the israeli defense forces really is raising concerns here and abroad. the president spoke again with prime minister benjamin netanyahu of israel. he has spoken with him each of the last four days since this really has escalated, mar rachlt they talked about the iron dome program. this is the rocket defense system that has worked relatively effectively at getting good reviews now. this is a system that the united states has helped design and pay for to assist israel. it has picked off maybe a third of the rockets that have headed into israeli territory over the past several days. they also talked about the need for a deescalation of what is happening. this exchange of rocket fire. the president also exchanging calls in the last 24 hours with the leader of turkey, the newly installed president of egypt, mohamed morsi, trying to encourage them to engage with hamas. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come t
a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya yan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight
is one of the senior commanders of hamas' rocket unit. however, we have been speaking to our sources here. we spoke to people in the neighborhood, and frankly they've never heard of this man. so it's not altogether clear whether this man had anything to do with or who he is, even, at all. so it's all rather confusing at the moment. what does seem to be clear is that israel is starting to focus on after-effects of jabadi, who is the leader of hamas' military wing, it seems they are focusing on his subordinates throughout the gaza strip. another senior commander in hamas' military wing was killed in gaza today, so that may be an indication that israel is starting to focus not so much on the infrastructure, the buildings, but also the leaders of hamas. gary? >> i just mentioned the air strike on the media center in gaza. there was a bit of a controversy with the timing of the attack. what do you know about it? >> reporter: well, there were actually two attacks, but one of them occurred at about 6:30 in the morning when a lot of these journalists were getting ready for live shots on the roof
's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what is happening there in your experience? >> the experience is covering operation costs led four years ago and be
'm jeff glor. i eight days of bomb blasts and a celebration in gaza tonight after israel and hamas agreed to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional s
the region can sometimes seem in short supply. hamas and the israeli government reached a cease-fire to stop the violence that left some dead in the course of the week. upon the announcement, they went out into the streets to celebrate while the opinion was cooler toward the news. one poll showed 31% of them approved of the cease-fire and 49% for opposed. hamas paid a heavy price, the destruction of the government buildings, estimates of 50 other fighters destroyed in bombings was able to point to the cease-fire as a victory. the text of the cease-fire reads in part, israel should stop all hostilities in the gaza strip, land, sea and erin colluding the targeting of individuals. israel is to commence, quote, opening the crossing and facilitating the movement of people and transfer of goods and targeting residents in border areas and implementation will be dealt with. that is why it is seen to loosen the restrictions. in other words, if it holds, and that is definitely a big if at this moment, it will represent a net benefit to the estimates 1.7 million people living in the gaza strip. for exa
that it may have amounted to a massacre at the house of one leading member of a hamas militant. according to israel, this is a house belonging to a senior official of hamas, but at the same time there were 12 people inside of that house, including four women and four children. all of them killed. so many people are condemning that attack. meanwhile, it is nighttime here and the people of gaza are bracing themselves for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomati
-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speaking on sunday, the president urged israel to avoid a ground invasion. >> israel has every right to expect it does
. >> hamas's rockets are reaching farther into israel than ever before. israel says they didn't cause much damage. palestinian officials say rockets from israel have killed 24 palestinians and wounded 200 in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been co
on that tenuous cease-fire between israel and hamas, one writer sees a silent but influential force at work behind the scenes of this conflict. so let's talk with frieda. she's a world affairs columnist for "the miami herald" and a "world politics review." and an old friend from cnn. >> good to see you, marty. >> let's talk about the column you wrote for cnn.com. i believe it's called iran, an ominous lengthening shadow. and it basically goes over this conflict and talks about how what we've just seen play out in gaza is an indication of what may be to come. what do you mean by that? >> well, the confrontation that we saw was between the palestinians of hamas in gaza and israel, but behind the scenes there was a strong power that was playing a role in some ways subtle and in some ways less subtle. iran is a friend of hamas, even though they have had their problems, but iran has armed insurgent groups. it's armed groups that oppose any kind of negotiated agreement with israel. it has backed them and has cheered them on, and israel expects that if there is a direct confrontation with iran, a direct
of a ground war in gaza. hamas' deputy foreign minister told cnn his government won't back down in the face of a threat either. >> they should not feel that it is an area that you can come and kill people and after that, you go home. you feel that if the people are not safe, your people in tel aviv will not be safe. >> reporter: sarah sidner, cnn, gaza city. >> and the fighting continues in gaza city. we'll talk more about that in just a minute. >>> we want to bring you in live now to washington. you see peter king there, the republican. he just exited a hearing that david petraeus was testifying in. of course, surrounding what happened in benghazi, libya. let's listen to congressman king. >> the original talking points prepared by the cia were different from the ones that were finally put out. as far as general petraeus, his testimony today was that from the start he had told us that this was a terrorist attack, terrorists involved from the start. my questions had a very different recollection of that, clear impression we were given is that the overwhelming amount of evidence is that it wa
begin in the middle east. this morning efforts to end the fighting between israel and hamas have so far come up short. fighting rages on both sides of the border. secretary of state hillary clinton held a late night meeting with the israeli prime minister. this morning she met with palestinian president. later today she will be in cairo to meet with world leaders. palestinian gunmen shot and killed six men they say were collaborating israel and dragged one body behind a motorcycle. susan mcginnis is watching all of this. >> reporter: good morning. once again there were signs of a deal and, again, they slipped away. now in cairo, secretary clinton will meet with officials who are in contact with hamas and now talking about a deal she says in the days ahead. as truce talks continue so does the violence. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes overnight and this morning. and hamas militants have launched more than 100 rockets into israel in the past 24 hours. five israelis and more than 1
was reached to stop the violence, after eight days of intense fighting. >> hamas has declared today a national holiday. and says israel is inevitably destined for defeat. with more, we're joined by abc's lama hasan, who is live in jerusalem. lama? >> reporter: good morning to you, brandi. we saw the cease-fire agreement yesterday that was mediated, brokered and announced by the egyptians. we saw the egyptian foreign minister announce that late last night that a cease-fire will take hold. that both israel and hamas have agreed to some of those terms. now, we saw the other major player in these negotiations, the united states. the foreign minister was flanked by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. and the feeling is that having her presence in the region has made a difference in expediting the negotiation talks. now, as for the cease-fire, it's safe to say that the region remains on -- quite tense at the moment. just waiting to see if the agreement will hold. now, both israel and hamas have agreed to some of those terms. and the main term is to stop the fighting. we're about -- over 13 hour
. >> hamas has declared today a national holiday. and says israel is inevitably destined for defeat. with more, we're joined by abc's lama hasan, who is live in jerusalem. lama? >> reporter: good morning to you, brandi. we saw the cease-fire agreement yesterday that was mediated, brokered and announced by the egyptians. we saw the egyptian foreign minister announce that late last night that a cease-fire will take hold. that both israel and hamas have agreed to some of those terms. now, we saw the other major player in these negotiations, the united states. the foreign minister was flanked by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. and the feeling is that having her presence in the region has made a difference in expediting the negotiation talks. now, as for the cease-fire, it's safe to say that the region remains on -- quite tense at the moment. just waiting to see if the agreement will hold. now, both israel and hamas have agreed to some of those terms. and the main term is to stop the fighting. we're about -- over 13 hours, now, into the cease-fire agreement. and it seems to be h
, everyone. scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. the cease-fire between israel and hamas has passed the first 24 hours. now comes the hard part-- negotiating the details of a truce to make sure is stays. a senior israeli official arrived in cairo today for talks. the head of hamas is there as well. in the meantime, israeli troops that were preparing for a ground invasion began pulling back today. and in gaza, palestinians are cleaning up the damage left behind by eight days of fighting. charlie d'agata is in gaza. >> reporter: gaza city's deserted streets came back to life today. weapons on both sides fell silent as the fragile cease-fire held. after eight days of living in fear, thousands of palestinians gathered in the city square to show support for hamas. you can feel the sense of relief here on the streets of gaza city today that the fighting is over. but hamas is declaring this a celebration of victory. and despite more than a week of suffering, that's exactly how people here see it. imad told us this latest fight against israel has united palestinians. >> we have a great victory here i
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it's basic. hamas wants the lifting of the blockade of gaza. israel wants the end of weapons smuggled into gaza. that's what the issue is going to be about. >> we've been talking the last couple days broadcasting through this
has brought a new round of rocket fire from israel and hamas. the conflict now in its seventh day. >> secretary of state clinton heads to the middle east to defuse the gaza crisis. >>> officials have been saying that some kind of a truce agreement may be imminent. secretary of state clinton will be meeting with benjamin netanyahu. >> thousands of u.s. marines are on the move. u.s. navy warships are heading closer to israel. >>> deadly storm now is crow ating a soggy mess in the pacific northwest. >> even by seattle standards, a lot of rain. already 7" and still counting. >>> cops now say the deadly explosion that blew up several homes in indianapolis may have been intentional. >> homicide investigation now is under way. two people were killed. seven others injured. >> there is a search for truth and a search for justice. >>> huge fire caused explosions and panic in north houston. >> looked like the world was on fire over here. >>> walmart workers plan to strike at 1,000 stores on black friday. >> it's not fair how they treat us. >>> touchdown! >> the b
in the middle east, where the fragile truce between israel and gaza hamas rulers appears to be holding 19 hours after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying
to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most missiles out of heavily populated areas. still some have made it through, like this rocket that hit a school. joining us now, nbc's eamon ayman in gaza. >> reporter: according to israeli military, more than 100 hit the gaza strip. this morning palestinian officials say the death toll from the past seven days has now reached 115 palestinians. nearly a third of them children. earlier this morning, four killed, two brothers a
to service of some sort. the relationship with hamas is extremely difficult. it's an incredibly jammed piece of terrain. many folks are living in there. obviously, there is a view of inadequacies in terms of support that exists in gaza, and the build-up tensions that exist. we've seen this before. the key is how do you keep it under control, and the only way you do is like the israelis are doing right now. they're doing very precise targeting against very pinpoint targets. you want to limit -- certainly limit the collateral damage that could take place. >> we know that u.s. secretary of defense leon panetta made that point to defense minister ehud barack saying it was important that there are surgical strikes, that you don't see these mass civilian casualties. do you think that's even possible here? do you think that they are heeding those warnings and that that perhaps would limit the amount of firepower, the amount of civilian casualties, and the escalation that could happen in the next hours and days to come? >> well, i know the israeli defense force, some of the now senior leaders, they
there. hamas leaders praised that bombing calling it a natural response to israeli massacres in gaza. in gaza, however, people took to the streets in celebration of that explosion in israel. the white house condemning the bus bombing, going on record saying that the u.s. will stand with its israeli allies. joining me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's su
just 12 miles from tel aviv. in gaza today hundreds of palestinians attended the funeral of a hamas military chief who was killed yesterday in a targeted attack. the israeli government has claimed credit for this incident, even posted video of the air strike at the precise time that it went down. it took to twitter to warn other hamas leaders to not go above ground in the coming days. hamas responded by saying israel has, quote, opened the gates of hell. last night president obama spoke with prime minister netanyahu about the escalating violence st stressing israel has a right to defend itself and urging him to make every effort to avoid casualties. amin, we saw that air strike, and a lot of people believe that was the moment this all escalated. the escalation and we've seen ebbs and flows but about ten days ago is when we saw a significant turn perhaps. >> reporter: that's correct. there are two very competing narratives about what happened. from the israeli perspective they say they've been suffering over the course of the last ten days and really over the last several years indis
in the 2008, 2009 offensive. they say the leaders are motivated by a desire to show they're strong on hamas. in fact, we spoke to one palestinian lawmaker who stressed the point that really this is all about politics. >> and ben, of course, one of the big concerns right now -- >> escalation was initiated by israel. there was a cease fire. there was a truce, which was violated by israel several times. unfortunately, we all don't want to have any innocent person hit or hurt, but it seems that mr. netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, decided to use israeli and palestinian blood for his election campaign. >> and certainly because there are elections planned for january of next year here in israel, it's widely expected that prime minister netanyahu will be re-elected for another term. this is the connection many palestinians are making. >> this is a delicate situation, ben. obviously all over the region, particularly for the new government in egypt. i understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it started out to be mistrustful of him but warming up to him the more he worked with the guy and frankly the more he needed him. so now you've got talk of morsi has being this missing piece, that kind of changes the whole dynamic in the middle east. he is the arab head of state with great leverage over radical groups like hamas
wasn't just hatched the morning after president morsi negotiated the cease fire between hamas and israel, so i really think that you know, they've been sitting and waiting to launch this as a you know, attempt. because there's a lot of things going on. there's a lot of challenges to the legal, you know, basis of the muslim brotherhood. there's lots of, the fact that there's been virtually no internal civilian or military security sector reform. the fact that you know, there's a court ruling in the drawer of the supreme constitutional court that could disban the assembly, so i think that was meant to preempt a lot of those. not to mention egypt just signed a $4.8 billion agreement with the international monetary fund and i believe that president morsi feels like he needs to be unaccountable as they undergo these very intense neo liberal economic adjustments. >> thanks very much for being here. obviously, it's a tense situation over there and a very important situation that will bear watching throughout this weekend. cnn will stay right on it. still "outfront," is this the retur
. >>> so the fighting began last week when hamas launched hundreds of rockets at israel, which were, i guess, in retaliation for israel killing the head of hamas's military, which was retaliation for hamas holding an israeli soldier hostage for five years, which might have been retaliation, which was in retaliation from what i heard is -- let's go back to when this thing first started. ♪
to the brink this weekend. israel expanding its air assault against hamas and palestinian militants continuing to fire rockets into civilian areas of southern israel. that's where i want to begin this morning. i've got nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell and "new york times" columnist tom friedman. who better to have to discuss this. tom, as the two sides get closer to the brink, based on your experience and reporting, where is this going? >> let's just go around the horn, david, quickly. i think hamas is trying to use this moment to both break out of the blockade and try to end targeted killing of its leaders from israel, and trying to take advantage of the new arab spring balance of power, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that can now hit tel aviv and jerusalem. egypt. this is a real problem for egypt. you have a new government there th
cease-fire between israel and hamas militants brokered by the u.s. government and egyptian president morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the
barak's resignation comes less than two weeks after israel launched an all-out strike on hamas military positions in the gaza strip, saying it could no longer tolerate the constant rocket attacks by hamas on his israeli territory. >>> the filmmaker behind "innocence of muslims" the crude anti-muslim short film that ignited protests in the islamic world says he has no regrets about making the film. in written responses, he also told "the new york times" he had no regrets about how he treated the cast, saying they signed contracts that did not prevent changes in the script. in addition the deadly protests the film also read to nakoula's arrest for providing supervised release on a friday conviction. he is currently serving time in jail in los angeles. >> human error is to blame for last week's gas explosion at a strip club in springfield, massachusetts. at least 21 people were injured by that blast, including 12 firefighters, and two police officers, as well. officials say a utility worker inadvertently punctured a hole in a high pressure gas line while responding to calls about a gas odo
pounded gaza for air strikes, potentially sochbling up militants for an invasion. but hamas is hitting back, firing rockets at random into israel, hoping for a hit. israelis can only wait for this sound, a screechi ining siren w of the rocket's approach. hamas' military wing says it shot down an israeli f-16 and other aircraft. israel denies losing aircraft. israel's military is using all of their weaponry at its disposal. here is a missile hit that israel says is the home of a hamas leader. those are your headlines at this hour. i'm don lemon, keeping you informed. cnn, the most trusted name in news. >>> as soon as jerry parks arrived at the entrance to jonestown in the spring of 1978 with his wife and youngest daughter, he saw guards with guns. >> i seen those armed guards. that's when my heart fell. i knew then -- i didn't have to wait until i got into jones tto. i knew then i'd made the biggest mistake of my life. >> reverend jim jones' home movies helped lure parks and his family to guyana. >> it was going to be a city right in the middle of a jungle, made it sound like really a p
-called terror sites. this just one day after israel killed the leader of hamas's military winging in gaza. today at least 13 other people in gaza were also killed. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says the attack is in response for some 200 rocks that have been landing in israel over the past 24 hours alone. 200. and at least three israelis who died as a result. the palestinians who have been seen here trying to put out fires inspect their damage and rush people to get medical attention. well, they say now the fears of retaliation, they fear retaliation because hamas says israel has opened the gates of hell. egypt to the south has pulled its ambassador now from israel and in just moments, i'm going to speak live with israel's defense minister ehud barak. so don't move. one. two. three. my credit card rewards are easy to remember. with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas! no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy most. [ woman in pet store ] it's as easy as... [
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 83 (some duplicates have been removed)